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  • Ale Trail

    Become part of the World's Biggest Ale Trail using the free CaskFinder app. Every Cask Marque pub should be displaying a certificate with a QR code on it.

    Register using the app and then scan these codes. The more you scan, the more prizes you win!

    Read More
  • Free Caskfinder App

    Available free for iPhone and Android phones, CaskFinder has been downloaded by over 80,000 people and is used over 50,000 times each month to find Cask Marque pubs selling great quality real ale. 

    View tasting notes for over 1,400 cask ales, brewed by over 200 British breweries, as well as details of beer festivals around the country and more.

    Read More
  • The Independent Award for pubs serving great quality cask ale

    Since 1997 Cask Marque has been ensuring that the real ale you drink in pubs in the UK has been in perfect condition. Our 45 qualified assessors make over 18,000 visits to pubs in England, Scotland, Wales and even Europe to check the temperature, appearance, aroma and taste of Britain's favourite drink.

    Visit a Cask Marque accredited pub and you are guaranteed to receive a great pint of cask ale.

    Read More
  • Find Cask Marque Pubs

    Find real ale pubs with our easy to use pub finder. There are over 8,000 to choose from so why not see which pubs near you are serving great quality cask ale?

    You can see who owns pubs and find similar pubs from a chain, or even see what beers were on sale when we last visited. All pubs are regularly visited by our qualified assessors to ensure you are guaranteed a great pint, every time.

    Read More
  • NOP-Survey

    In a recent NOP Survey, 57% of cask ale drinkers recognised the Cask Marque plaque and 62% related the sign to beer quality.

    Interestingly, awareness is higher; 67% in the 21 to 44yr old category, which must in some part be due to the CaskFinder app, which is used over 60,000 times per month to find Cask Marque Pubs.

    Read More
  • Beer is the most profitable part of your business, but do you know that 34% of customers would not return if the quality of the pint served was poor?

    The Award in Beer and Cellar Quality is a Bii accredited training course and is designed to help you improve yields (by up to 7%), increase sales (3%) and decrease wastage.

    Cask Marque are the UK’s No 1 provider of Cellar Management Training with a team of experienced trainers passionate about getting beer quality right, first time.

    Read More

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Uncategorised

There are some wonderful people out there scanning so many certificates and visiting so many pubs that I think we need some more categories!

1000 Scans (in order of attainment)
1. Jean-Paul Russek
2. Carl Griffin
3. Alison Stazicker
4. John Graham
5. Andy Bateson
6. Alan Ash
7. Steven Booth

600 scans
Jean-Paul Russek
Carl Griffin
Alison Stazicker
John Graham
Andy Bateson
Carl Brett
Stephen Booth
Alan Ash
Paul Edwards
Sandra Ilic
Paul Markham
Sam Compton
David Hume
Michael Horton
Iain Dobson
Zsolt Bencsik
David Slater
Alan Bates
Gary Timmins
David Sharlot
Doug Robinson

100 Scans
The following people have become Cask Marque Ambassadors by reaching 100 scans on the World's Biggest Ale Trail. They are listed in alphabetical order. Thank you to you all for helping us to develop the ale trail with their honest and constructive feedback, it has been invaluable.

A-D E-L M-Q R-Z
  • Adrian Mellow
  • Alan Ash
  • Alan Barnard
  • Alan Bates
  • Alan Booker
  • Alan Foster
  • Alan Southgate
  • Alexei Samarenko
  • Alison Stazicker
  • Alistair Oliver
  • Andrew Brett
  • Andrew Chilton
  • Andrew Cross
  • Andrew Evans
  • Andrew Frith
  • Andrew Garnett
  • Andrew Jones
  • Andrew Griffin
  • Andrew McMinn
  • Andrew Moss
  • Andrew Oakes
  • Andrew Rawlins
  • Andrew Southan
  • Andy A
  • Andy Bateson
  • Andy Bishop
  • Andy Cleverdon
  • Andy Evans
  • Andy Hardy
  • Andy Jolly
  • Andy Lucas
  • Andy Koszary
  • Andy Sly
  • Angela Walker
  • Anil Gomes
  • Annabel Levy
  • Anne Lepiorz
  • Anthony Mooney
  • Ashley Barras
  • Audrey Morton
  • Barbara Ruddlesden
  • Barry Clifford
  • Barry Hickles
  • Barry Sellers
  • Becky Peacock
  • Ben Lloyd
  • Bill Kirkbride
  • Bill Woolley
  • Bob Goold
  • Blake Robins
  • Bob Lee
  • Bob Pennyfather
  • Brian Capel
  • Brian Fare
  • Brian Spurling
  • Brian Sullivan
  • Brendan Rise
  • Bronwen Dunstan
  • Carl Brett
  • Carl Griffin
  • Carl Muspratt
  • Carl Rokas
  • Carole Ann Johnson
  • Charles Gill
  • Cheryl  Johnson
  • Chris Bedford
  • Chris Bell
  • Chris Blackburn
  • Chris Draper
  • Chris Frank
  • Chris Hird
  • Chris Hope
  • Chris Reynolds
  • Chris Spry
  • Chris Stoneham
  • Chris Wilcock
  • Christopher Hodgson
  • Christopher Murphy
  • Christopher Rudd
  • Clare Armitage
  • Clare Brown
  • Clare Pickin
  • Claire Tennant
  • Clive Stonebridge
  • Craig Jenner
  • Craig Newton
  • Craigy Banks
  • Daffyd Hirst
  • Dan Britton
  • Dan Elmore
  • Dan Kane
  • Daniel Doherty
  • Daniel Marsden
  • Danny Matthews
  • Darren Worrall
  • Darryl Marsh
  • Dave Ackrill
  • Dave Cotton
  • Dave Morton
  • Dave Tennant
  • Dave Rees
  • Dave Young
  • David Ballentyne
  • David Bellamy
  • David Carter
  • David Hill
  • David Charnock
  • David Hinton
  • David Hodgson
  • David Hume
  • David Johnson
  • David Johnson II
  • David Knight
  • David Lands
  • David Mills
  • David Mooney
  • David Moore
  • David Morton
  • David Mountford
  • David Osborne
  • David Parry
  • David Ruddlesden
  • David Scott
  • David Sharlot
  • David Slater
  • David Thwaites
  • David Woods
  • Dawn Abbot
  • Dean Bailey
  • Deb Holland
  • Debbie Lear
  • Deilwen Rowe
  • Derek Reynolds
  • Derry Barnes
  • Des Keegan
  • Diane Causey
  • Dominic Mancini
  • Donald Starr
  • Donna Judge
  • Doug Robinson
  • Eoin Shaloo
  • Ed Loach
  • Ed Lomas
  • Edward P
  • Edward Shankley
  • Emma Jackson
  • Emma Mykytyn
  • Evelyn Harrison
  • Fiona  Booth
  • Frank Wood
  • Frank MacDougall
  • Gary Kelt
  • Gary Marchant
  • Gary Timmins
  • Gavin Jenkins
  • Geoffery Bates
  • George Burnell
  • George Tobitt
  • Geraint Jones
  • Gethin Wilson
  • Gill Warner
  • Glynn Hemingway
  • Gordon Cleugh
  • Gordon Henry
  • Graham Coombs
  • Graham Eaton
  • Graham Hall
  • Graham White
  • Gray Bags
  • Greg Simpson
  • H Edgcombe
  • Hannah Clarke
  • Hazel Stilgoe
  • Hazel Pattinson
  • Heather Burgess
  • Heather Linnell
  • Heather Strothard
  • Helen Davies
  • Helen Graham
  • Helen Jones
  • Helen Lyth
  • Hugh Birkinshaw
  • Hugh Johnstone
  • Hugh Money
  • Iain Dobson
  • Ian Beadle
  • Ian Boyd
  • Ian Brown
  • Ian Conley
  • Ian Ferguson
  • Ian Fisher
  • Ian Griffiths
  • Ian Mathias
  • Ian Stanton
  • Ian Swanson
  • Ioannes Wilkes
  • Jack Rake
  • Jackie Hampton
  • James Ball
  • James Beveridge
  • James Gore
  • James Grigg
  • James Jones
  • James Mumford
  • James Phillips
  • James Welham
  • Jason Phillips
  • Jason Potts
  • Jeremy Burke
  • Jeremy Mason
  • Jo Barnes
  • Jo Godwin
  • John Beetham
  • John Bellinger
  • John Davies
  • John Galletly
  • John Graham
  • John Lauder
  • John McGraw
  • John Milward
  • John Kearney
  • John Mccallum
  • John Scott
  • John Seabourne
  • John Walker
  • John Ward
  • Jon Bradbury
  • Jon Collyer
  • Jon Healy
  • Josh Bullock
  • JP Russek
  • Judith Cutforth
  • Justin Green
  • Karen Matkin
  • Karl Hammett
  • Karl Povey
  • Keith Bartlett
  • Keith Minchall
  • Keith Lethbridge
  • Keith Rogers
  • Keith Turner
  • Kerry Sawyer
  • Kev Pridgen
  • Kev Sly
  • Kevin Barham
  • Kevin McElduff
  • Kevin Moore
  • Kevin Lyth
  • Kevin Seward
  • Kevin Travers
  • Kirsty Sims
  • Lana Jefferys
  • Laurence Ralph
  • Leanne Rhodes
  • Lee Allen
  • Lee Jones
  • Leigh Bartlett
  • Lewis Mills
  • Linda Milward
  • Liz Johnson
  • Liza Graham
  • Louise Mathias
  • Lynn Holmes
  • M Brookes
  • Malc Holland
  • Mandy Mills
  • Marcus Lewis
  • Margaret Corlett
  • Mark Davies
  • Mark Dunham
  • Mark Godwin
  • Mark Halliday
  • Mark Holland
  • Mark Granados
  • Mark Hulston
  • Mark Patey
  • Mark Payne
  • Martin Ennis
  • Martin Gibson
  • Martin Hamblin
  • Martin Harburn
  • Martin Lear
  • Martyn Thorne
  • Matt Crivelli
  • Matt Dinnery
  • Matthew Chidgey
  • Matthew Spence
  • Mel Tosh
  • Michael Court
  • Michael Hird
  • Michael Horton
  • Michael Lee
  • Michael Rainbird
  • Michael Thompson
  • Mick Allen
  • Mick Attwood
  • Mike Dewar
  • Mike Hampshire
  • Mike Ventham
  • Nathan Saunders
  • Neil Bentley
  • Neil Easton
  • Neil Kelly
  • Neil Whitehall
  • Niall Cooney
  • Nick Bate
  • Nick Harrison
  • Nick Parker
  • Nicky Marsh
  • Nicola Jarvis
  • Nick Heaviside
  • Nigel Parker
  • Nigel Summers
  • Nikki Ennis
  • Pam Gardner
  • Patrick Bate
  • Paul Betteridge
  • Paul Carter
  • Paul Cocks
  • Paul Dodds
  • Paul Edwards
  • Paul Elliott
  • Paul Etherington
  • Paul Finnimore
  • Paul Greenhalgh
  • Paul Hampton
  • Paul Markham
  • Paul Mills
  • Paul Olivant
  • Paul Richards
  • Paul Sennett
  • Paul Stainer
  • Paul Stow
  • Paul Vincent
  • Paul Whitehall
  • Paul Wilkinson
  • Paul Williams
  • Pete Greatorex
  • Pete Spratt
  • Peter Abrams
  • Peter Anderson
  • Peter Hunt
  • Peter Lyth
  • Peter Mauldon
  • Peter Neesam
  • Peter Ramsden
  • Peter Rickwood
  • Peter Smith
  • Peter Ventham
  • Peter Wilkinson
  • Peter Wilson
  • Peter Young
  • Phil Boardman
  • Phil Graham
  • Phil Marten
  • Phil Matkin
  • Phil Rowe
  • Phil Wignall
  • Philip Cleverdon
  • Philip Groves
  • Philip Parkins
  • Philip Powell
  • Philip Smith
  • Philip Turland
  • Ray Adamson
  • Ray Arrowsmith
  • Ray Corlett
  • Rhiannon Clement
  • Rich Milligan
  • Rich Roberts
  • Richard Alexander
  • Richard Campbell
  • Richard Elliott
  • Richard Griffiths
  • Richard Gwynne
  • Richard Jones
  • Richard Sawyer
  • Richard Prattley
  • Ricky Wainwright
  • Rob Dickson
  • Rob Haycock
  • Rob Hawkins
  • Robert Cutforth
  • Robert Jones
  • Robert Smith
  • Robert Wells
  • Robin Chandler
  • Robin Gandy
  • Rodger  Fox
  • Roger Nelson
  • Rolf Jones
  • Ron Boyd
  • Sam Compton
  • Sandra Ilic
  • Sandra Pridgen
  • Sarah Bellis
  • Sarah Gill
  • Sarah Horton
  • Sarahjane Careswell
  • Sean O'Neill
  • Sean Saxton
  • Simon Barton
  • Simon Best
  • Simon Gillingham
  • Simon Hall
  • Simon Hollis
  • Simon Miller
  • Simon Page
  • Simon Hanson
  • Simon Marley
  • Simon McSorley
  • Simon Parnaby
  • Simon Turner
  • Stephen Hills
  • Stephen Jackson
  • Stephen Kelly
  • Stephen Knight
  • Stephen Norton
  • Stephen Riddell
  • Stephen Warburton
  • Stevan Eggleton
  • Steve Holt
  • Steve Philpots
  • Steve Pennington
  • Steve Price
  • Steve Rivers
  • Steve Rogerson
  • Steve Wyche
  • Steve Wyllie
  • Steven Booth
  • Steven Heaton
  • Stuart Jenkins
  • Stuart Moss
  • Sue Cotton
  • Sue Harrison
  • Terry Dunsdon
  • Tim Beeden
  • Tim Bradley
  • Tim Gill
  • Tim Pearson
  • Tim Woodrow
  • Toby Hawkins
  • Tom Bexter
  • Tom Slater
  • Tony Conway
  • Tony Fenech
  • Tony Judge
  • Tony Legat
  • Tony Sheridan
  • Tony Smith
  • Tracy Hyslop
  • Tracey Marshall
  • Trev Noronha
  • Trevor Hyde
  • Ursula Vasey
  • Vaughan Evans
  • Valerie Helliwell
  • Victoria Martin
  • Vinicius Joner
  • Wal Provart
  • Wayne Kavanagh
  • Wayne Pilkington
  • Wayne Wheeler
  • William Morris
  • Yvette Lethbridge
  • Zsolt Bencsik

What's the difference between cask ale and lager or keg ales?

Cask Ale

Alternatively known as real beer, cask beer, real ale, cask conditioned beer, beer from the handpump

PT sniffing•    Is a fresh, natural product full of flavour and character.

•    Is one of the best tasting, most satisfying drinks in the world when served in good condition.

•    Is made from 4 wholesome ingredients: water, malted barley, hops and yeast

•    Is an unpasteurised, fresh product containing live yeast (the bio-yoghurt of the beer world)

•    Is fermented twice, once at the brewery and once in the cellar of the pub

•    Isn’t fizzy or over-creamy because it has no added gas. The light sparkle, or ‘tingle on the tongue’ in cask ale is from carbon dioxide produced naturally during the fermentation process

•    Can be identified by the ‘handpull’ on the bar

•    Casks are ‘barrel’ shaped containers, mainly stillaged on their bellies to help trap the yeast sediment with a tap in the cask ‘head’ and a ‘spile’ inserted in the filling aperture which is used to control the ‘condition’ or CO2 content of the beer. In restricted cellars, it is possible to dispense cask beer from a cask set vertically by inserting a long stem into the tap hole which does not quite go to the bottom of the container where the yeast sediment lies.

•    Needs very special care and attention by licensees: they receive from the brewery an unfinished product. The quality of what they serve to the customer depends on their routine, care over hygiene and their commitment to standards. Once put on sale, a cask should be sold within 72 hours at the most as it is a living product.

•    Should be totally clear and served at a cool 11 – 13 degrees centigrade (cool and refreshing and allowing all the full flavours and aromas to be savoured)

•    And most importantly of all, unlike keg products cask ale is a product which can only be experienced in its full glory in the pub

 

Keg beers, smooth beers, lagers and stouts are different from cask beers. They:-

lager

•    Most of the world’s beers are pale lagers making the ale market in the UK and particularly the cask sector very special indeed. Lagers are cold fermented with a yeast strain which can tolerate a cooler fermentation. They are served cold with a higher carbon dioxide content than keg ales which tend to have nitrogen added to the dispensing gas which gives the beer a creamy head and, to some, ‘less bloat’.

•    All keg beers are brewery conditioned: they undergo only the primary fermentation, are cold stabilised in the brewery and are then pasteurised or sterile filtered.

•    As they are filtered, they contain no live yeast

•    Have gas added in order to give them a fizz or a ‘smooth’ texture

•    Can be identified by the type of font or tap (they are served by switching on rather than pulling through) on the bar.

•    Are usually served at a chilled 6-8 degrees centigrade or if they are extra cold then between 0-5 degrees C.

•    In the cellar, kegs will be stood on end for dispensing with a coupler attached to the single aperture which feeds gas into the keg to push the beer towards the bar.

•    Not all keg beers are produced by our multi national brewers. A number of smaller craft breweries have invested in the chilling equipment needed to produce keg beers, particularly lager. In a competitive cask market, this gives them access to sports clubs, restaurants etc which may not have the cellar space to serve traditional cask beer.

If you have downloaded our CaskFinder app you may have noticed that you can vote for your favourite beer. So far 55,775 votes have been made for your favourite beers. We have only included those with 30 votes or more.

Below are the top 100 beers with their % rating, the number of votes they received and also the rating they had when we last produced a list in early February 2013. The list of beers to choose from comes via www.cyclopsbeer.co.uk and as such it is possible that some beers are not available to vote for. If your favourite beer does not appear on this website then send us an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will approach the brewer and encourage them to put their beer through this tasting system.

Updated: 15th November 2013

fav beers nov 2013

Online training courses are very popular as they allow staff to learn without having to take precious time away from their place of work.

The Introduction to Cellar Management e-learning course ensures premises are competent with best practice in the cellar, and how to maintain high standards to deliver best quality draught products.  The course serves as an ideal pre-learning module to the one day Award in Beer and Cellar Quality qualification.

The course is designed for operators and their staff, ensuring that the cellar is maintained no matter whose shift it is.  The training covers how to look after cask and keg beer from cellar to glass. Staff will learn:

•    The difference between cask and keg beer
•    The importance of cellar hygiene and temperature
•    Stock control and accepting deliveries
•    How to condition cask ale
•    How to change kegs
•    What checks are required before beer goes on sale
•    What cooling equipment is and how to maintain it

This course is a great opportunity for you and your staff to learn more about the equipment you are using and will help improve yields, increase sales and minimise waste.

To take the course visit http://www.cple-learning.co.uk/xconsole/ or tel 0151 647 1057.

Cost is £20 + VAT per delegate.

The course is called "Cask Marque Cellar Management"